Tag

credit utliization Archives | Ovation Credit Repair Services

repair your credit

4 Simple, Effective Ways to Repair Your Credit

By | Credit Repair

Anyone can make mistakes — and some of those mistakes can impact your credit standing. Even if you’ve always taken great care with your credit, unforeseeable crises can easily undo all your good work. Just as a few serious problems can torpedo your credit rating, a few smart strategies can help you bring it back to life. Fortunately, you don’t have to carry that burden indefinitely.  Here are some simple, effective things you can do to repair your credit.

Repair Your Credit Tip 1 – Start Over With Secured Credit

The worst-case scenario in the credit world is bankruptcy. This last-ditch move can indeed give individuals a fresh financial start, but in the process, you can expect to lose your credit. Oddly enough, you may start receiving credit card offers in the mail sooner than you’d expect. But this can prove a dangerous kind of trap. The creditors making the offers know that you won’t be permitted to file for bankruptcy again for at least 7 years, meaning that you’ll be stuck with paying them back even if you get into trouble.

Still, there is one kind of credit card you definitely should look into: a secured credit card. This card is backed up by a cash deposit, with the credit limit typically equalling the deposit amount. Use this card carefully and pay it off in full every month. By doing so, you’ll be rebuilding a positive credit history that can set the stage for your successful credit repair journey.

Repair Your Credit Tip 2 – Reduce Outstanding Credit Balances

You could have an excellent credit payment history, with multiple lines of credit going back many years, and still get turned down for a loan because of a high credit utilization ratio. This term refers to the amount of your credit tied up in outstanding balances. Lenders generally recommend that you keep your credit utilization ratio under 30 percent of your total credit limits. If you need to reduce your outstanding balances, you may want to try either of two popular debt payment techniques:

  • Snowballing – Snowballing involves paying down one credit line at a time, starting with the lowest balance. For instance, you might pay $25 above a $25 minimum payment (or $50 a month total) to accelerate repayment until the balance hits zero. You then take that $50 monthly payment and add it to the monthly minimum payment on the next-lowest balance. Repeat this process, and you’ll see that credit utilization drop at an ever-faster pace.
  • Stacking – Stacking is the same basic technique as snowballing, except that it involves paying the credit lines down in order of interest rate, with the highest interest rate going first. This may be less satisfying than seeing those smaller balances disappear quickly, but in the long run it’ll save you more money.

Repair Your Credit Tip 3 – Go Easy on the Applications

If you’re tempted to obtain a new credit card to make your credit utilization ratio lower, take care. While your utilization will indeed drop as your total available credit rises, that new credit line will require what’s known as a “hard pull,” or credit review. This type of review can temporarily make a bad credit score even worse. Actually using the card will compound your troubles if you don’t make certain to pay it off faithfully each month.

Other types of loan applications can also ding your credit, at least in the short term. Each car loan, home loan, or other kind of bank loan application will result in a hard pull. Too many of these inquiries can seriously disfigure your credit score. The fewer credit lines or shorter credit history you have, the more damage your score will take. If you need to shop around for the lowest rate among multiple lenders, make all those credit applications within the same 30-day credit cycle. Creditors recognize rate shopping when it occurs in this pattern, and they will score those multiple applications as a single hard pull.

Repair Your Credit Tip 4 – Watch Your Credit Report

Consumers who struggle with credit issues are only human — but so are the people who enter information into creditors’ databases and credit reports. It’s always possible that inaccurate data is depressing your credit score unfairly. You may also be suffering the effects of a co-signer or other party who has damaged your credit without your realizing it.

You can catch these issues by requesting and studying copies of your credit report from each of the three major credit reporting agencies (Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion). You’re legally entitled to one free copy of each report per year, and you can also purchase additional copies. If you see something wrong, you can dispute that entry and possibly get it expunged from your record. Once you’ve sent a written dispute letter, ideally via Certified Mail, the reporting agency is required to investigate the possible error within 30 days’ time.

As you can see, there’s no single “magic bullet” to repair your credit. But the right combination of best practices, implemented with patience, intelligence, and consistency, can give you the power to fix those nagging credit issues and prevent them from recurring. Last but not least, you’ll enjoy the tremendous feeling of accomplishment and empowerment that comes from taking control of your own destiny — and that’s surely something worth taking credit for!

Sources:

https://www.bankrate.com/finance/credit-cards/10-questions-before-getting-a-secured-credit-card-1.aspx

www.nerdwallet.com/blog/finance/improve-your-credit-utilization-ratio-fast/

https://www.thebalance.com/debt-snowball-vs-debt-stacking-453633

https://www.moneytalksnews.com/ask-an-expert-will-opening-a-new-credit-card-hurt-my-credit-score/

https://www.myfico.com/credit-education/credit-checks/credit-report-inquiries/

https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/personalfinance/2015/08/22/nerdwallet-check-your-credit-reports/32129411/

https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0151-disputing-errors-credit-reports

Credit Utilization: Master This Key Scoring Factor

By | Credit Scores

Imagine two people borrowing the same amount of money from the same lender. One has a stellar credit utilization ratio. The other has a relatively poor number. Well, the first person could end up paying thousands of dollars less than the second individual due to a lower interest rate.

Your credit utilization rate accounts for 30 percent of your overall credit score. Given its significance, you should strive to make yours impressive.

Credit Utilization Rate

 

Calculating Credit Utilization

To figure out your credit utilization ratio, take your monthly balance and divide it by your credit limit. Let’s say you have a credit card with a $2,000 limit. Last month, you charged $200 on it. When you divide 200 by 2,000, you get 0.1. Thus, last month’s utilization ratio for that card is 10 percent.

Your credit reporting agency will give you a utilization score for each of your credit cards as well as other types of credit like home equity loans. It will also assign you an overall credit utilization score. The agency will compute that comprehensive number by adding all of your balances and all of your limits and then dividing the first sum by the second.

If your credit utilization score is too high, it’s harder to obtain loans with favorable terms. That’s because potential lenders will see you as someone who charges too much and who may, at some point, have trouble making loan payments.

Know Your (Credit) Limits

For a credit utilization score, the magic number is 30 percent. Try not to go over it. A strong utilization rate is between 10 and 20 percent, and an exceptional one is less than 10 percent.

To stay below the 30 percent mark, always monitor your credit card limits. If a credit card issuer lowers your limit, rely on that card less often. Conversely, if a credit card company raises your limit, you can feel free to use that card a little more frequently. Similarly, keep checking your balances online. If you’re coming close to 30 percent on one of your cards, don’t touch it again until next month.

Your credit card companies might have a program wherein they text you when you’ve hit a certain percentage of your limit. You could ask them to let you know when you’ve reached 20 percent or so.

Credit Card Carefulness

If your credit utilization score is currently higher than 30 percent, don’t worry too much. You can bring it down soon enough. Your first step is to carry more cash and keep more money in your checking account. That way, when you shop for groceries, clothing and other personal items, you can leave your plastic in your purse or wallet.

In addition, don’t shop on the Internet as much. Or, if you must buy products from digital stores, get in the habit of using a debit card rather than a credit card. Always search cyberspace for deals and discounts, too.

Higher Credit Lines

You might want to get in touch with one or more of your credit card issuers to apply for a limit increase. Just be aware that a credit card company must conduct a hard inquiry on anyone who makes such a request. A hard inquiry will probably lower your credit score a little.

Seeking a limit increase carries some risk. If your credit history isn’t in good shape, your credit card company could choose to reduce your limit instead, putting you in an even worse predicament.

On the other hand, if your credit report is exemplary, you could receive a credit limit increase without even asking for it. Either way, with a greater limit, you could spend the same amount of money, but your utilization rate would still go down.

In any event, approach a higher credit limit with caution. When you’re granted one, it’s natural to start spending more. And, unfortunately, it’s easy to go too far. In short order, you could be facing a higher credit utilization rate and mounting debts.

Shaky Strategies

Could you lower your utilization ratio by getting more credit cards and spreading out your spending? It’s possible, but you should resist that idea. A credit reporting agency might view your new credit cards in a negative light and lower your score accordingly. Not to mention, every time you apply for a credit card, the issuer will have to do a hard inquiry.

Plus, with extra credit cards, it becomes more likely that you’ll charge more than you can afford or forget to make a payment.

Give Yourself Some Credit

Finally, it’s a great idea to partner with a credentialed credit repair company. Its team members can study your credit history and find mistakes, questionable entries and other problems that are unfairly bringing your scores down, including your credit utilization ratio. Those pros can then contact your credit reporting agencies and convince them to fix the inaccuracies.

Knowing that your credit utilization number is going in the right direction should give you feelings of pride and security. Getting a low interest rate and advantageous conditions on your next loan or mortgage will feel even better.

Sources:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/financialfinesse/2016/12/04/how-to-improve-your-credit-score-quickly/#69802877499a

http://www.military.com/money/personal-finance/credit-debt-management/what-should-your-credit-utilization-be.html

http://money.cnn.com/2017/05/08/pf/credit-score-tips/index.html

https://money.usnews.com/money/personal-finance/articles/2012/07/24/tips-for-maximizing-your-credit-score-when-it-counts-most

https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/finance/credit-utilization-improving-winning/

https://www.thebalance.com/understanding-credit-utilization-960451

Credit Changes After Co-Signing a Loan

By | Loan

Co-signing on a loan is a big decision. You are putting your name on something that is not even for yourself. It requires trusting the other party to be as responsible a borrower as you are. This can be disastrous, but sometimes it works out okay.

Co-Signing Loan

Regardless, there are implications to your credit profile. Your score could drop, and you could even be left on the hook for the balance. If the other applicant fails to repay and the debt goes to collections, it can really hurt you.

Here’s typically what happens when you co-sign.

Applying Results in a Hard Inquiry

Your credit score has an initial drop from the hard inquiry. This occurs when your credit file gets pulled by the lender to see if your creditworthiness can secure the loan. Typically, your score will drop anywhere from 5 to 25 points after one or more hard inquiries in a specific time frame.

This factor is pretty negligible. Your credit score will lift back up soon after, as long as the loan gets repaid on time. Hard inquiries also only stay on your report for two years and usually impact your credit score for no more than one year.

Your Credit Report Gets a New Account

Assuming that the co-signed loan is approved, there’s now a new account showing on your credit report. How it appears will depend on the specific loan. But, in most cases, it will be an installment debt. This means the borrower must pay a fixed amount across so many intervals of time.

This type of debt will post as the full balance until it’s paid entirely. If it is a one-time need, the goal should be to cover the debt right away. The longer you carry the co-signed loan on your report, the more your score gets calculated with higher debt balances.

As with any debt, the credit reporting agency will notify the bureau every so often. Any payments made on time, or late, will get marked both on the credit report of the co-signer and the borrower. This late payment can impact the credit score of both parties. If it is your first late payment, it could mean 100 points or more lost.

Credit Utilization Ratio — How Does It Change?

Thankfully, co-signing on a loan is not the same as helping someone get a credit card. These installment debts will not play a role in your credit card utilization rate. This means that the second-biggest factor of your credit score will not be harmed. Since 30 percent of your FICO score depends on your credit utilization stance, this is a very good thing to realize.

However, while it doesn’t hurt your utilization rate, it almost does in the perspective of a new lender. Assume you try to qualify for a mortgage: Suddenly, the total debt you carry is higher. If you qualified for a $160,000 home loan prior to co-signing a $15,000 line of credit, now, until it gets paid, you might only be approved for $145,000.

Worst Case Scenario — Credit Score Damage From Co-Signing

By being eligible to co-sign, chances are you take your creditworthiness seriously. The amount you help someone borrow might be negligible versus what you can already borrow yourself. If so, the worst case scenario is that you have to pay the debt yourself — including any interest and penalties.

However, the damage is more crippling if you are unaware of payments in arrears. It is imperative to communicate with the borrower. You need to know if there will be a late payment — so you can prevent it from happening in the first place. As mentioned earlier, your scores could drop 30 to 100 points or more after just one 30-day late entry on your credit report.

Thankfully, there’s a bit of power for the co-signer. You have the right to request monthly statements. This is the simplest way to ensure payments are always made on time, and if a missed payment occurs, you can act on it quickly.

Your credit score will already have enough downward pressure. Just look below at how your co-signed loan can weigh in on some of the main credit rating factors:

  • Payment history: 35% of your FICO score depends on your payment history. Any late payments can be severely damaging to your score. A single missed payment could drop your score enough to cost you tens of thousands, especially if you plan to refinance your home soon. Your next loan will get approved with a lesser score, subjecting you to worse interest rates than normal.
  • Credit age: 15% of your score is made up of the length of your credit history. This new account is fresh and will influence a lower average age for your open accounts. It will close at some point and no longer be a factor. Regardless, while the account is open, it will only reduce the average credit age of a co-signer.
  • New credit: 10% of your score is also fundamentally backed by your new credit. FICO looks at whether you can really afford any new debt you take on. There might be large loans in your name already, and your credit score qualifies you as a co-signer. Yet, you might not be seen as someone able to afford more debt right now. Even though it is not technically yours, it is for this part of your score calculation — which is risky.

Conclusion

Co-signing a loan might not hurt your credit profile as much as you think. It’s more of a concern if you plan to finance a big purchase in the near future. But, absolutely never co-sign unless you trust the other borrower. Also, make sure to have funds available elsewhere in case you suddenly need to pay the loan off to save your credit.

Sources:

https://www.credit.com/credit-reports/what-is-a-hard-inquiry/

http://budgeting.thenest.com/late-payment-affect-cosigner-24854.html

https://www.thebalance.com/how-will-a-late-payment-hurt-my-credit-score-960543

http://www.creditcards.com/credit-card-news/help/5-parts-components-fico-credit-score-6000.php

http://www.moneycrashers.com/cosigning-loan-reasons-risks/

Boo! Credit Scores Can Be Scary, Fear Not with These 5 Secrets

By | Credit Scores, Uncategorized, Your Credit

Credit score repair company

Credit Scores can seem scary when you think about how that three-digit number can affect so many financial decisions in your life. Frightening enough, that score can then scare away lenders when you’re applying for a loan or a mortgage. The ones not frightened away give you a horrifying interest rate!

Before you go and hide under your covers, here are 5 ways to calm your fears and improve your credit score.

1. Pay Off Your Balances, Especially Large Ones, Quickly

This pointer might sound obvious, but the sooner you can eliminate your balances, the healthier your credit score will be. If you make a hefty purchase with a credit card, try to pay it off right away, even if you must sell a favorite possession to obtain the funds. When you do so, you might find that your score goes up substantially. Plus, you’ll lower the interest rate you’re paying. At the very least, try to pay down your highest balances to the greatest extent that you can.

If you’ve routinely paid your credit card bills late, don’t fall into despair and assume that punctual payments won’t do you any good now. Instead, start paying those bills on time. Despite your history, your credit score will eventually reflect your newfound effort. What’s more, you’ll get into a good habit.

Remember as well that you can use an online service that will automatically pay your credit card debts each month. Such a tool will ensure that you won’t ever forget one of your bills.

2. Consider a Debt Consolidation Loan

You could speak to a financial expert about taking out a debt consolidation loan. This solution isn’t ideal for everyone, but perhaps you’d benefit from one.

First, you might find it easier to pay off your credit cards by combining the amounts of money you owe to various credit card companies into one sum. It might feel less painful to make a more substantial payment each month rather than a series of smaller payments. Plus, you won’t accidentally overlook a payment that you owe. Even more appealing, your overall interest rate will be lower. And taking out such a loan might soon result in a higher credit score.

3. Bring Your Credit Utilization Ratio Down

Your credit utilization ratio is the portion of your total credit limit that you spend every month. This ratio should be less than 30 percent. Of course, that number might sound low, especially if your limit is less than $1,000.

Keep calculating your credit utilization ratio each month. If you find that it exceeds 30 percent, try to pay more with cash or a debit card. You could also try to make fewer purchases, rely on coupons and discounts more often or start shopping around for less expensive products and services.

Another way to improve your credit utilization ratio is to ask for a higher line of credit. That way, you might not need to reduce your spending rate. If you have any credit cards that will grant such an increase without investigating your credit, consider making this request. Just be certain that none of those companies plan to do a hard credit check; having such an inquiry performed lowers your score a little.

4. Don’t Be Afraid to Use Your Credit Cards

Even though it’s important to keep your credit utilization ratio down, you should still be making regular purchases with all of your credit cards. Spending with your plastic and then making your payments in full is a highly effective way to raise your credit score. By contrast, when you completely avoid taking your credit cards out of your wallet or purse, you’re not doing anything positive for your credit report. And closing one or more of your credit cards could actually hurt your score.

On top of that, using your credit cards might allow you to collect exciting rewards. Possibilities include securing special deals on airfare and hotel stays as well as getting cash back when you buy certain items. Why pass up those goodies?

5. Seek Help from an Outstanding Credit Repair Service

Finally, a dependable credit repair service can help you boost your score and maintain that higher number over the long haul. It can keep careful track of your credit report and identify any mistakes or irregularities that might be unfairly damaging your credit.

The experts who work at such a company could also sit down with the credit card companies and other parties you owe money to. And they might be able to hammer out new agreements that are more lenient and favorable to you.

So there you have it: five financial tricks that can lead to real credit treats. These actions could provide you with the monetary rewards ― including better loan terms and insurance rates ― and the peace of mind that come with a healthy credit report.

 

Call Now for a FREE Credit Consultation

CALL US NOW