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6 Ways Your Credit Score Impacts Your Life

By | Credit Scores

If you’re like most people, you won’t know your credit score until you suddenly realize it’s important. Normally, this happens when you apply for a mortgage or another large loan.

You see, you might be ignoring your credit score, but banks, businesses and other lenders aren’t. For these users, your credit score is a vital snapshot of your financial well-being and trustworthiness, and it enables them to manage their risk when lending to you, hiring you or selling you their services. It’s the culmination of every large financial decision you’ve ever made — and it can have a significant impact on your future decisions.

Let’s take a look at some of the significant ways in which your credit score impacts you.

1. The Interest Rate on Your Mortgage

Your mortgage is likely to be the biggest loan you take out in your life, and your credit score plays a significant role in determining which mortgage you can get and how much it is going to cost you. Applicants with a low credit score, indicating potentially risky financial behavior, are likely to have to pay a higher interest rate on their loan and, in some cases, may be rejected outright.

A small change in the percentage of interest you pay might not seem like much, but with many mortgages stretching from 25 to 35 years, it represents thousands of dollars of extra spending.

2. Whether You Get the Rental Property You Want

Not bought a house yet? Your credit rate still affects your choice of home. After your earnings-to-rent ratio, your credit score is the most important factor in deciding whether your rental application is accepted. Given the choice of two applicants with similar earnings, the one with the higher credit score will always win — landlords know that by reducing their risk, they save money.

3. The Car You Drive

In 2017, the average auto financing loan had an APR of 4.21 percent, with most loans falling between 3 percent and 10 percent APR. The difference between a great credit score and a very poor one is even bigger: Someone with a very bad record might receive as much as 20 percent, while some users with a great record can still get zero percent APR. The difference between the two can easily amount to hundreds or even thousands of dollars per year.

4. Your Refinancing Options

As interest rates change, what seemed like a good deal a few years ago can quickly become expensive; by refinancing your mortgage or student loan, you can save a lot of money. Unfortunately, if you have poor credit your ability to do this may be limited or nonexistent.

It doesn’t matter what your credit score looked like when you first got the loan, either. Many borrowers have a good score when they get their mortgage, then fall into bad practices. When they try to refinance, their now-reduced credit score limits their options and gives them a nasty shock.

5. Your Employment Opportunities

Many employers like to credit-check job applicants before making a hire, particularly if the role comes with a large amount of financial responsibility. Although they’re not lending you money, the business is exposing themselves to risk of another kind by putting their finances and reputation in your hands. By screening out applicants with a poor credit score, businesses aim to reduce workplace theft and fraud.

6. Taking Out a Student Loan

If you’ve already borrowed the maximum federal student loan amount, it’s likely you’ll need to turn to a private loan to make up the difference to cover your tuition. These private loans (issued by a bank, credit union or school) are affected by your credit score, just like a mortgage or auto loan. This can come as a shock to students who have only dealt with federal loans before (which aren’t affected by credit score).

You’ll probably be paying off your student loan for years to come — a poor credit score could add thousands of dollars to the amount.

The Impact Can Be Positive or Negative

We’ve primarily focused on the negatives of having a poor credit score in this article, but at the other end of the spectrum are a bunch of people who get great deals on everything. Their above average credit score enables them to get better mortgages, cheaper loans, and superior work and housing opportunities. And because their interest rates are lower, maintaining their score is easier — it’s an unfortunate fact that the high interest rates those with a low score receive make it harder for them to improve that score.

Achieving Your Desired Credit Score

There’s no such thing as an irredeemable credit score; with time, effort and discipline, anyone can improve their score and access better rates. But, it doesn’t happen overnight — it takes time. Which means that the best time to improve your score is always now. You need to start preparing your credit score in advance if you want to get the best deals on a mortgage.

Unfortunately, the information on your credit profile doesn’t always tell the whole story — through no fault of your own, this information can be incomplete or even inaccurate. When that happens, your best bet it to repair your credit profile.

Ovation Credit Services helps the 79 percent of consumers whose credit reports contain a mistake of some kind. Sign up today and take the first step toward repairing your reputation!

Build, Grow & Repair Credit

By | Your Credit

Whether you’re new to having credit or you’ve had credit cards for years, growing your credit, protecting it and repairing your credit takes work. This guide can help you manage all of your debts and improve your credit score.

Topics in This Guide:

Build or Rebuild Credit at Any Age:

  • Access and Review Your Credit Reports
  • How High Balances Affect Your Credit
  • How Long Does it Take to Repair Credit?
  • How to Avoid Paying Credit Card Interest
  • How to Improve My Credit Score
  • How to Repair Credit Mistakes
  • How to Repair Credit When You Don’t Have a Job
  • Identity Theft and Your Credit
  • Using Your Tax Refund to Pay Off Credit Cards

Credit and Mortgages/Refinancing a Home:

  • How to Pick the Best Type of Mortgage
  • Refinancing a Home and How it Affects Your Credit

Let’s begin!

Build or Rebuild Credit at Any Age

If you’re in college, you might ask yourself, am I “too young” to start building credit? The best time for credit-building is when you have a reliable job and pay your bills on time every month.

Your credit report is the history of your credit payments, and items stay on your reports for up to 10 years, or longer for student loans. Typically, you’ll have credit cards, lines of credit, student loans and installment loans. To build credit, use credit moderately and pay the balances quickly.

Access and Review Your Credit Reports

You can receive a free credit report annually from AnnualCreditReport.com using a secure, private computer. You need to enter your social-security number, address and date of birth. Then you can view credit reports from Experian, TransUnion and Equifax and make copies of your report. Remember never to save it on a public computer.

Familiarize yourself with your credit report. It shows accounts that are open, closed, paid-off and in collections. It also gives your payment dates. It may include student loans, installment loans, bankruptcies or other accounts.

Tip: You can access a free credit report from AnnualCreditReport.com.

How High Balances Affect Your Credit

When you carry high debts, you can damage your credit score even if you pay minimum balances on time. High balances let creditors know that you might be struggling to make payments.

How Long Does it Take to Repair Credit?

To repair your credit, businesses have 30 to 45 days to respond to disputes. After that, disputed items like collection accounts are removable.

How to Avoid Paying Credit Card Interest

If you pay your full balance each month, then you won’t have to pay interest. Always pay on time to avoid late fees.

How to Improve My Credit Score

Your credit-card payment history makes up 35 percent of your credit score. To improve your score, keep your balances low. Pay on time and never let accounts go into collections or charge-offs that are 180-days past due. If you fall behind, then make the payment as soon as you can.

How to Repair Credit Mistakes

Maybe you’ve done a search online for “how to fix my credit.” First, review your credit reports and flag anything that you don’t recognize or anything older than seven years. To dispute credit mistakes, select the option “dispute” when your credit report is open and give the reason. For example, maybe you don’t recognize the account, or it’s older than seven years.

Creditors have 30 to 45 days to respond, but you might hear back from them sooner. If they don’t respond, then you can often remove disputed items from your account’s report.

How to Repair Credit When You Don’t Have a Job

If you’ve lost your job and fallen behind on payments, talk to the collection agencies about making smaller payments. You may be able to remove collection accounts older than seven years if you dispute them on your report. Never discuss bills older than seven years with collection agencies because any correspondence reopens the account.

For further help, check with Ovation Credit for credit-repair assistance.

Identity Theft and Your Credit

If you want to know how to dispute credit report charges you don’t recognize when you’re on a credit-report site viewing your report, then select the option to “dispute” on your screen and give further details.

If anyone has stolen your identity, then contact the credit-reporting bureau and your credit-card company. You may need to file a police report to block any further fraudulent transactions on your account. Having a company that monitors your credit is very beneficial to avoid situations like this.

Using Your Tax Refund to Pay off Credit Cards

Use tax refunds to pay off credit-card debts. The average refund is $3,000, and you’ll improve your credit score. With better credit, you can get lower interest rates.

Credit and Mortgages/Refinancing a Home

How to Pick the Best Type of Mortgage

To pick the best mortgage, talk to your bank about mortgage options. FHA mortgages or those by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs can be more-affordable options. U.S. Department of Agriculture mortgages and the first-time buyers program are also worth considering.

Refinancing a Home and How it Affects your Credit

Refinancing your mortgage is taking out a new loan to replace your current loan. People take this step to lock in lower interest rates. When banks run a credit report, it can lower your score slightly. If it’s only one inquiry, then it may not affect your credit that much.

Bottom Line

Credit cards often lead to debts and huge responsibilities. By paying your credit-card bills on time, you can have a good credit score and better interest rates for years to come!

References:

www.nerdwallet.com/blog/mortgages/how-to-choose-the-best-mortgage/

http://blog.credit.com/2017/10/my-debt-was-charged-off-what-does-that-mean-120856/

 

Use Savings on Mortgage to Pay off Credit

By | Credit Cards, Mortgage

use-savings-on-mortgage-to-pay-off-creditNot everything to come out of the recession was bad news. One of the best things that happened thanks to the recession was a downward pressure on interest rates. The Federal Reserve Chairman, Ben Bernanke, sets the interest rate based on the country’s economy. Recently, Bernanke announced that the Fed would keep rates low (near 0%) through 2015 or until the unemployment rate falls below 6.5%.

The rate set by the Fed is how much banks pay for money, and when the rates are low for them, they are typically low for consumers as well. Right now, mortgage lending rates are nearly the lowest they have been in decades. A 30-year fixed mortgage is at 3.75% and a 15-year fixed mortgage is at 3.0%. (We don’t recommend choosing adjustable rate mortgages).

These rates mean a lot to homeowners and potential homeowners. When rates are low, more people can qualify to buy homes, and the homes you do buy cost less per month to own. A $200,000 house would cost less than $1200 per month, without taxes and insurance, at these low rates, where the same house would have cost nearly $2000 per month  at 8.75% interest. In addition to making the monthly payment more manageable, lower interest rates also mean you pay less interest over the life of the loan. The difference between 3.75% and 8.75% on a 30-year fixed mortgage is $291,226!

If you already own a home, you can take advantage of these low rates by refinancing. Refinancing is the process of obtaining a new loan, either with the same lender or a different lender, on an asset you already own. When refinancing your home, the new loan pays off the existing loan and can often include additional money in your pocket for things like home improvements or to pay off other debts. You can either shorten the term of the loan or extend it back out over 30 years again, which can lower the monthly payment even more. When you consider that the average credit card interest rate hovers around 16-18% and a home loan can be had at 3.75%, there’s no question that it can cost you less to refinance, take cash out, and pay off your credit debt. If you’re not comfortable adding more debt to your mortgage to pay off your credit cards, you can simply use the money you save on your monthly house payment to pay down credit debt.

When deciding whether or not to refinance, the rule of thumb is that you can typically recover the cost of refinancing if you plan to remain in the home for longer than two years. If you are under water on your mortgage or if the value of your home is less than it was when you bought the home, you may qualify for special refinance programs like HAFA and HAMP. To learn more about these programs, visit Making Home Affordable, the official government information site for special lending and refinance programs.

 

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